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Emerald Ash Borer Treatment Demo in Rochester, NY

On July 29, Eric Bristol and Joe Aiken, Midwest Regional Technical Manager, will be demonstrating how TREE-äge® Insecticide is injected into ash trees with Arborjet equipment to protect them from Emerald Ash Borer.  The demonstration will be at Manhattan Square Park in Rochester, New York from 8:30am to 9:00am.  Tour des Trees riders will be attending, as well as Brian Liberti, Rochester City Forester, and other city officials.  The city of Rochester is using TREE-äge to protect over 3,700 ash trees on public property.

This event will be attended by media, and will demonstrate how the city of Rochester is protecting 3,700 ash trees against the Emerald Ash Borer.

Emerald Ash Borer Treatment Demonstration

Monday, July 29, 2013, 8:30 am – 9:00 am

Ron Levinson injects an ash with a TREE I.V.

Photo by George LeClaire | Staff Photographer, Daily Herald

Location:

Manhattan Square Park
350 Court Street
Rochester, NY 14607

Speaking Agenda:

  • Mary DiCarlo, TREE Fund
  • Anita Gambill, TREE Fund Trustee
  • Brian Liberti, Forester for the City of Rochester
  • Eric Bristol, Arborjet, Injection Demo
    • Joe Aiken, Arborjet, Regional Technical Manager for NY will also attend.

You have a unique opportunity to see the STIHL Tour des Trees come through Rochester, NY.  The City of Rochester will be the first stop for nearly 100 bike riders participating in the 580 mile journey over 6 days.  The ride starts in Niagara Falls and rides around Lake Ontario ending in Toronto for the ISA Annual Conference.

©2013 Arborjet, Inc. Important: Always read and follow label instructions. Some crop protection products may not be registered for sale or use in all states or counties. Please check with your state or local extension service to ensure registration status. TREE-äge® Insecticide is a Restricted Use Pesticide and must only be sold to and used by a state certified applicator or by persons under their direct supervision. TREE-äge® is a registered trademark of Arborjet, Inc.

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Arborjet Rides in the STIHL Tour des Trees

Eric Bristol, Marketing Manager

Rob Gorden, Director of Urban Forestry and Business Development

In addition to Arborjet’s goal to save 1 million trees in 2013 (Million Tree Challenge), two Arborjet employees and one spouse are riding their bikes in the STIHL Tour des Trees to raise money for the TREE Fund which funds research and education for urban forestry.  Eric Bristol, Marketing Manager at Arborjet, is riding 580 miles from Niagara Falls to Toronto, Canada.  Rob Gorden, Director of Urban Forestry and Business Development, will be riding 140 miles from Belleville to Toronto, and his wife Lillian Gorden is riding 50 miles from Oshawa to Toronto.  Beginning on July 28 you will see daily blog posts about our journey.

 

 

About the 2013 Tour des Trees

Tour des Trees Full Map

Map of the tour

The 2013 STIHL Tour des Trees promises an international adventure for cyclists beginning July 28, 2013 in Niagara Falls, Ontario. Tracing a 585-mile route around Lake Ontario, the 2013 Tour will showcase upstate New York and Ontario’s beautiful scenery, historic trees, urban centers and favorite destinations. The Tour concludes August 3 at Ontario’s Toronto Island, site of ISA’s International Tree Climbing Competition and Arbor Fair.

Tree plantings and community outreach are hallmarks of every Tour, and Professor Elwood Pricklethorn (aka Toronto arborist and veteran Tour cyclist Warren Hoselton) provides educational programs for young audiences along the way. The TREE Fund expects to add at least a dozen new entries to the growing urban forest planted by Tour riders over the years.

 

Video from 2011 Tour


STIHL Tour des Trees SUPER SLAMMER -final from Craig Kimberley on Vimeo.

Arborjet’s Commitment to Urban Tree Research

As a partner with the TREE Fund this year, Arborjet donated $25,000 in funding to help support research and education that may lead to new and innovative ways to protect the urban forest.  In addition, Arborjet donated over $100,000 in grants to other non-profit organizations in 2013 to continue advancing the industry.

About the TREE Fund

TREE Fund PartnerThe TREE Fund organization works to sustain the world’s urban forests by providing funding for scientific research, education programs, and scholarships related to arboriculture and urban forestry. Through the generous support of corporate and individual sponsors and donors the TREE Fund offers:

    • Funding for scientific research into critical urban tree care issues
    • Funding for arboriculture education programs in schools
    • Scholarships for aspiring arborists
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Save Your Ash!

SYA_logo1We recently launched a brand new website, video, and billboard letting homeowners know they can save their ash trees  from Emerald Ash Borer with trunk injection treatments with Arborjet. Check out some of the highlights below!

Video

Website

Visit SaveYourAsh.com for more information!

Visit SaveYourAsh.com for more information!

Billboard

ARBORJET save your ash_Digital Billboard

Posted in Emerald Ash Borer, News, Pest Info, Trunk Injection | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

The cost of the Emerald Ash Borer infestation

According to a recent post from the US Forest Service’s Northern Research Station, the true cost of Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) could reach over $10.7 billion.

Emerald Ash Borer - Image by Dave Cappaert

Emerald Ash Borer – Image by Dave Cappaert

The post references a research study conducted by the foremost minds in EAB management and research, which used computer modeling to determine the potential spread and estimate the cost of treatment, removal, and replacement. It “focused on developed land within established communities in a 25-state area centered on Detroit. There are an estimated 38 million landscape ash trees in this area.”

The outcomes revealed:

The simulations predict a growing EAB infestation that is likely to include most of the 25 states. Responses to the infestation include treatment, removal, and replacement of more than 17 million ash trees at an estimated cost of $10.7 billion. Expanding the land base of the simulations to include developed land outside, as well as inside, human communities nearly doubles the estimated number of ash trees and the cost. The simulations also suggest that a large investment could be spent efficiently to slow the expansion of isolated EAB infestations and postpone the ultimate costs of ash tree treatment, removal, and replacement.

What can you do to slow the spread of EAB?

  1. Determine if you’re in an EAB-affected area.
  2. If your area is under quarantine, contact a local service provider to evaluate your property’s trees for potential treatment.
  3. Encourage your neighbors to have their trees treated to save the mature trees in your neighborhood.
  4. Ask your city’s leadership what their plan is for EAB management. Push for treatment of healthy trees rather than removal and replacement.
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The Arboretum City

Have you ever been to Bexley, OH? It’s a suburb of Columbus and home to just over 13,000 residents. In fact, there are more trees than residents in Bexley (over 14,000), and those trees are comprised of over 130 different species. bexleyarboretum

What makes Bexley so special? It’s “the first city in the United States to successfully obtain arboretum accreditation.” The Morton Register of Arboreta awarded the accreditation, which recognizes the city’s 25-year participation in the Arbor Day Foundation’s Tree City USA program.

That’s some dedication to the urban forest!

Click here to read more about Bexley and its status as a Level II Accredited Arboretum. What do you think? Would your city qualify as an arboretum?

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New Hampshire Governor Declares EAB Awareness Week

Governor Hassan Declares May 19-25, 2013 Emerald Ash Borer Awareness Week

Recognizing the threat emerald ash borer poses to the trees and forests of New Hampshire, Governor Hassan issued a proclamation declaring next week Emerald Ash Borer Awareness Week. She urges all citizens to learn more about emerald ash borer, to make a commitment to using either certified heat-treated or locally produced firewood–buy it where you burn it, to identify ash trees on your property and inspect them for signs of emerald ash borer, and to report suspicious ash trees and insects to state and federal plant regulatory officials at www.nhbugs.org or 800-444-8978.

Expect to see press including PSA’s and social media about EAB Awareness Week. Please take this opportunity to share information about emerald ash borer to your family, friends, neighbors and professional colleagues.  Read the text of the proclamation.

Infested Trees—Signs and Symptoms—Two Field Trips Planned

We still have space in next week’s field trips to look at the emerald ash borer in Concord.

Kyle Lombard, Forest Health Specialist with the N.H. Division of Forests and Lands is hosting two field trips to look at signs and symptoms of infested trees in Concord. Highlights include infested trees, d-shaped exit holes, serpentine galleries, “blonding,” and perhaps even adults emerging from the rearing station. The field trips will be mostly outdoors, but will start at the emerald ash borer staging station at the old NH DOT warehouse at 11 Stickney Ave. The warehouse is across the road from the Concord Coach Lines bus station

The dates and times:

  • Tuesday, May 21 from 10 to noon
  • Wednesday May 22 from 10 to noon

To register: email debra.anderson@unh.edu and indicate which day you will attend. There is limited space and we will need attendees to car pool with each other from site to site.

As workshops are planned, we add them to our “attend a meeting” page on www.nhbugs.org.

Not to forget other invasive insects…

Woodlot owners in particular might be interested in attending the UNH Community Tree Farm Field Day on June 1, on-campus in Durham. One of the stops will  be at the UNH hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) insectary. Learn how UNH will raise beetles that feed on invasive HWA. Kyle Lombard, N.H. Division of Forests and Lands will take us through a three‐acre tract managed as an insectary to raise natural predators of the HWA. If successful, this project will provide beetles for distribution throughout the region to help control HWA. There is a registration fee and we ask people to register by May 24. Read more about the day UNH Community Tree Farm Field Day or register online.

Governor Hassan Declares May 19-25, 2013 Emerald Ash Borer Awareness Week

Recognizing the threat emerald ash borer poses to the trees and forests of New Hampshire, Governor Hassan issued a proclamation declaring next week Emerald Ash Borer Awareness Week. She urges all citizens to learn more about emerald ash borer, to make a commitment to using either certified heat-treated or locally produced firewood–buy it where you burn it, to identify ash trees on your property and inspect them for signs of emerald ash borer, and to report suspicious ash trees and insects to state and federal plant regulatory officials at www.nhbugs.org or 800-444-8978.

Expect to see press including PSA’s and social media about EAB Awareness Week. Please take this opportunity to share information about emerald ash borer to your family, friends, neighbors and professional colleagues.  Read the text of the proclamation.

Infested Trees—Signs and Symptoms—Two Field Trips Planned

We still have space in next week’s field trips to look at the emerald ash borer in Concord.

Kyle Lombard, Forest Health Specialist with the N.H. Division of Forests and Lands is hosting two field trips to look at signs and symptoms of infested trees in Concord. Highlights include infested trees, d-shaped exit holes, serpentine galleries, “blonding,” and perhaps even adults emerging from the rearing station. The field trips will be mostly outdoors, but will start at the emerald ash borer staging station at the old NH DOT warehouse at 11 Stickney Ave. The warehouse is across the road from the Concord Coach Lines bus station

The dates and times:

  • Tuesday, May 21 from 10 to noon
  • Wednesday May 22 from 10 to noon

To register: email debra.anderson@unh.edu and indicate which day you will attend. There is limited space and we will need attendees to car pool with each other from site to site.

As workshops are planned, we add them to our “attend a meeting” page on www.nhbugs.org.

 

Not to forget other invasive insects…

Woodlot owners in particular might be interested in attending the UNH Community Tree Farm Field Day on June 1, on-campus in Durham. One of the stops will  be at the UNH hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) insectary. Learn how UNH will raise beetles that feed on invasive HWA. Kyle Lombard, N.H. Division of Forests and Lands will take us through a three‐acre tract managed as an insectary to raise natural predators of the HWA. If successful, this project will provide beetles for distribution throughout the region to help control HWA. There is a registration fee and we ask people to register by May 24. Read more about the day UNH Community Tree Farm Field Day or register online

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Post update: the link between EAB and human health

At the end of January, we published a post that raised the question as to whether tree health (or lack thereof, thanks to Emerald Ash Borer) and human health are related. Recently, a number of articles have come out that discuss this phenomenon in more detail.

Emerald Ash Borer - Image by Dave Cappaert

Emerald Ash Borer – Image by Dave Cappaert

The Washington Post

The Washington Post’s Urban Jungle blog posted a story examining the details of the study. Author Patterson Clark synthesizes:

Although the authors did not detail any direct cause-and-effect relationships, they did cite previous studies demonstrating the health benefits of trees: They improve air quality, moderate temperature and provide opportunities for physical activity; trees are psychologically soothing and act as buffers for stress; a walk through the woods reduces heart rates and lowers cortisol levels; children living on tree-lined streets are less likely to have asthma.

The post goes on to say that treatment options are expensive, which isn’t necessarily the case. A two-year control injection treatment can cost less than your monthly cable and internet bill. Compare that with $800-$1,000 to remove a mature tree, not to mention the loss to property value, stormwater runoff, and increased heating and cooling costs.

WTOP 103.5

Also in the DC area, radio station WTOP posted a story following up on the study as well. Author Andrew Mollenbeck interviewed researcher Geoffrey Donovan, who confirmed:

We found that in counties that were infested with the emerald ash borer, we saw higher levels of cardiovascular and lower respiratory disease. Human interaction with the natural environment is a fundamental part of human health and well-being.

This particular story shared the following from the study:

Tree loss from the spread of the emerald ash borer is associated with increased mortality related to the cardiovascular and lower-respiratory systems. This relationship is particularly strong in counties with above-average median household income.

What do you think? Has the suspected link between Emerald Ash Borer and increased cardiovascular disease caused you to reconsider treating your ash trees or providing treatment as an option for your customers? Is your city treating its ash trees in public areas?

Posted in Emerald Ash Borer, News, Pest Info, Tree Benefits, Tree Info, Trunk Injection | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Arborjet Announces Million Tree Challenge

arborday_infographic_image

Arborjet, a company that develops remedies for some of the world’s most destructive tree insects and diseases, invites municipalities and homeowners from coast to coast to join together this Arbor Day to become part of the “Million Tree Challenge™” and help save one million American trees.

Invasive tree pests like the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) are wreaking havoc on America’s urban forests and have destroyed over 60 million ash trees to date, but there are effective ways to prevent this destruction. By joining the “Million Tree Challenge,” America’s cities and homeowners can work to save more trees from early demise.

To mark the commencement of the “Million Tree Challenge,” Arborjet is donating trunk injection treatments to protect 50 of the most highly-valued trees in Kansas City, a Tree City USA community, from EAB. The public is invited to join Arborjet; the Greenway Fields Homes Association; and Bret Cleveland of Urban Tree Specialists at 10:30 A.M. on Saturday, April 27th at Strawn Park (63rd Street and Valley Road) in Kansas City, Missouri, for the first symbolic treatment, along with a demonstration of the trunk injection technology, during the Greenway Fields Tree Census and Arbor Day Celebration (10 A.M. to 1 P.M.).

In 2012, over 850,000 trees were protected against tree pest attacks via quick acting, long lasting trunk injection treatments from Arborjet. In addition, the rescue of these trees also had a significant economic impact, saving the United States an estimated total of $714 million– $612 million in tree removal and replacement costs, and an annual tree benefit value of $102 million in storm water runoff, property value, energy savings, and air quality (per the National Tree Benefit Calculator).

“As an environmentally responsible treatment, trunk injections cost significantly less than removing and replacing mature trees and help preserve the environmental, economic and aesthetic benefits trees bring to us all,” said Russ Davis, President and COO of Arborjet. “Our hope is that by declaring the “Million Tree Challenge™,” we can encourage everyone to help save one of our country’s most treasured assets, our trees.”

How Tree Trunk Injection Works:

Used by forward-thinking municipalities and certified arborists nationwide to ensure the trees in America’s urban forests and neighborhoods remain beautiful now and in the future, the appropriate formulation dose is injected directly into a tree’s vascular system and moves quickly to the target area. Unlike spraying and soil drenching, tree trunk injections are sealed in the tree, limiting environmental exposure. Nothing is placed into the air or soil at the time of injection. The active ingredient keeps working through the tree’s vascular system, providing long lasting protection. There is even one injectable treatment available that protects trees against 25 different insect species for up to two years and can stop damage if a tree is currently under attack.

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What Arborjet is all about

tree word cloud- big

Have you used a word cloud before? This one is pulling all the content from arborjet.com to create a visual representation of the content on our site. The larger words appear most frequently over the pages and the smaller ones less so.

Share your word clouds with us!

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Pesticides: How Long Will They Keep?

Frequent questions are “how long is a pesticide good for?” and “how long should I keep a pesticide?” Pesticides in general are manufactured, formulated, and packaged to specific standards. However, when stored improperly, they can break down in storage, especially under conditions of high temperature and humidity.

Some pesticides can lose their activity through chemical decomposition or volatilization. Dry formulations such as wettable powders (WP) or granular (G) can become caked and compacted; emulsifiable concentrates (EC) can lose their ability to form emulsions. Some pesticides can actually become more toxic, flammable, or explosive as they break down.

Pesticide formulations that contain low concentrations of active ingredients generally lose effectiveness faster than more concentrated forms. Sometimes a liquid pesticide develops a gas as it deteriorates, making opening and handling containers quite hazardous.

Certain pesticides have a characteristic odor. A strong odor in the storage area may indicate a leak, spill, or improperly sealed container. It may also be a clue that the pesticide is deteriorating, because the smell of some chemicals intensifies as they break down. If none of these problems are found, chemical odors can be reduced with exhaust fans, or by lowering the temperature of the storage area.

Pesticide containers (including fiber and metal drums, pails, cans, bottles, bags, boxes, overpacks and liners) have an important effect on storage and shelf life. If stored for long periods, these containers may eventually corrode, crack, break, tear, or fail to seal properly. Also the label may become illegible.

Pesticides, if stored in a cool, dry area that is out of direct sunlight, will generally have an extended shelf life. In general, properly stored pesticides will retain their effectiveness for at least three to five years. Biological pesticides, such as Bacillus thuringiensis, tend to have shorter shelf lives than chemical pesticides.

Protection from temperature extremes is important because heat or cold can shorten a pesticide’s shelf life. At temperatures below freezing, some liquid formulations separate into their various components and lose their effectiveness. High temperatures cause many pesticides to volatize or break down more rapidly. Extreme heat may also cause glass bottles to break or explode. Storage temperatures should not exceed 100 degrees F frequently or for extended time periods.

One way to ensure you won’t have shelf life or storage problems is to buy only what you think you will need for one season. So many times we buy the sale item because it’s a ‘deal’. What we find out is that we only needed a small portion and now we have to store the leftover chemical. A good tip is to write the date you purchased the product on the container itself or the label. There are no expiration dates on pesticides, so this will serve as a reminder regarding how old the product is.

If you have to store chemicals, read the label and follow any specific guidelines listed. Store different groups of pesticides, such as herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides in separate locations within a storage area to prevent cross-contamination from fumes, vapors, and accidental use of the wrong container. Never store chemicals near any type of animal feed. Always store out of the reach of children, preferably in a locked cabinet.

(Martha A. Smith, Horticulture Educator, University of Illinois Extension. Used with permission from PEST Vol. 17 No. 1, March 2012)

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